GARY PANG

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Chinese tea pork with noodles

Recently, I had a pot of tea, spices and soy sauce left over from making Chinese tea eggs. Since the tea mixture tasted good, I decided to cook some pork and noodles with it. Nothing goes to waste!

I chose pork roast because it was on sale at my local supermarket. For some reason, somebody stocked “Chinese-style” noodles in the vegetable aisle.

My home is two hours from the closest Chinatown (Philadelphia), so I’ll take what I can get. Time to make Chinese tea pork with noodles!

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Ingredients

  • 1.88 lb. Pork roast
  • 9 oz. Chinese-style noodles
  • 32 oz. Box of butternut squash chunks
  • Leftover tea and soy sauce

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Improvised Chinese tea pork

I wanted the roast tender and filled with flavor. Sounds like a job for my Crock-Pot. It’s been stashed away for more than a year … Time for it to see the daylight! (Actually, I started cooking 1 a.m. on a Saturday. )

Besides the tea mixture, I added more water and soy sauce until the liquid covered the roast. Then, I threw in a cinnamon stick, some star anise and a packet of sugar, too.

 

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I planned to slow-cook it on low heat for 8 hours. However, I woke up late the next day. So, the roast ended up cooking for 12 hours. It was, however, very flavorful and tender!

I took a couple bites before bringing it out of the kitchen. “Taste-testing,” as my mom would say before family dinners. My sister disagrees; she calls it “stealing food” from guests.

 

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Time to pull the pork apart into shreds!

 

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Here are the “Chinese-style” noodles with the shredded pork.

 

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Bring water to boil. Add noodles and return to boil. Then cook for 3 minutes.

 

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Rinse and drain noodles. I would never rinse pasta, not even fresh fettuccine. However, these noodles were very starchy. They did need a shower to wash off excess starch.

 

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Finally, I added some leftover butternut squash. Baked them a couple nights earlier with a fair amount of Chinese five-spice powders.

The noodles were surprisingly good. Firm to the bite, like “al dente” pasta.

Grocery Bill

Ingredients for my Chinese tea pork with noodles cost $11.97. But, they yielded three bowls, so that was $3.99 per meal.

  • Pork roast, Swift Premium brand: $4.49 on sale (normally $7.50)
  • Butternut squash chunks, Nature’s Kitchen: $4.99
  • Chinese noodles, Nasoya: $2.49

Kitchen Tips

  • The pork tasted even better and juicier after a couple nights in the refrigerator. During those nights, the roast was soaked in the tea mixture.
  • Many recipes say the roast must be coated in flour, then browned. My dad says that’s unnecessary for what I was doing. I like his idea. Less work is better!
  • I should have trimmed the solid fat off the uncooked roast first. It would have been easier. Instead, I left the fat on, and it melted  in the slow-cooker. I had to use a spoon to scoop up the pig fat.

2 Comments

  1. The pork looks AMAZING! Are you being any leftovers home?

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